Home > Business, Culture, Ethics, Local Government, Local Politics, National Politics, Policing, Principles, Restoring Democracy > Deference should no longer be given just because of a job title, role or what people are. Respect should be given to everyone on the basis of who people demonstrate themselves to be

Deference should no longer be given just because of a job title, role or what people are. Respect should be given to everyone on the basis of who people demonstrate themselves to be

The general feeling of disgust with the way our Politicians behave and the contempt that they demonstrably feel towards the people who gave them their power, is leaving a bad taste in the mouths of many.

There is a growing realisation amongst us that the people we have trusted to represent us and make decisions on our behalf, simply aren’t the people we think they are.

Yet this awakening to how things really work and operate is not restricted to the current tenants within our broken political system alone.

In fact, the behaviour and misuse of just about every public office or role of influence at National level and within our communities is coming into question. As more and more of the incumbents blur the lines between what their priorities should be and what they clearly are.

MPs provide the best example, because they are in one of the very few of these roles which can be seen and observed by everyone’s eyes.

But the departure from the expectation of what any position of responsibility to the public or to our communities requires of the individual is present at every level. Many of those who have taken jobs, appointments or voluntary roles that carry with them the ability to influence lives and our way of living for the better, are now simply not doing so. They have pursued these roles to gain benefits and advancement of their own.

It doesn’t matter whether they are MPs, Councillors, Mayors, Police & Crime Commissioners, Chief Constables, Government Officers, Academics, Charity Leaders or indeed any role that is there to work on behalf of us all or for the public good. Many are following their own agendas and motives.

This malaise is no small part the reason that public services and services run on our behalf don’t seem to work as well as they should.

Its why for some who have had their lives or businesses directly impacted by this self-serving madness, there is a simmering question of how things have got this bad and how they got this far.

If you are not already asking this question yourself, the chances are that you soon will be. And the answer includes facing up to the reality that we all share some of the responsibility when it comes to identifying who is at fault.

It’s not an act we have carried out or words that we have spoken. This problem that we have facilitated, boils down to the way that we think.

Many of us grew up and were conditioned to believe that any public-facing role within our communities would ensure that the incumbent was worthy of deference and our respect by default.

For a long time, that was certainly the case. And we also dealt with the odd case of deviance from that expectation by seeing it for what it was: the one rotten apple in the barrel, with no reason to assume the motives and integrity of the others had failed to remain on par.

But times have been changing without us seeing that change for what it was or what it means.

The past 5 or 6 decades has seen an obsession with money and material wealth take over as the driver for so much of what we all experience or do. As a direct result, the motives for people to pursue a role of public service – even in the commercial sphere – has evolved to being all about what people can get, instead of what those people can do.

Great people at all levels often suffer from what is known as imposter syndrome. They gain roles and responsibility through merit and hard work, but still feel that someone has made a mistake and that at some point they will ‘get found out’. Alternatively, they attain recognition they thought would be impossible to achieve and simply reward themselves by thinking that it must have been something that everyone could have done because they did it; not realising that they are the only one.

But now we have this problem across society, created by years and years of people climbing their way up the ladders of public roles and public service, just because they believe that getting that job or securing that role will be the one thing that will make them great.

Nobody explained to any of the charlatans we have masquerading as public leaders, that if you were not a great person or if you didn’t have the potential to be one already, you wont suddenly become great because you have a title, role or job.

Because they don’t have the ethics, morality, care and consideration for others that people who do the right things at every turn normally possess – because that’s the person they are, these humanesque cockoos function only to live up to what they think everything they do should look like, instead of concentrating on doing the best job that they can instead.

Whilst the idiosyncrasies, influence and responsibilities of each and every role that referred to here to may be different, there are distinct commonalities to the way that the wrong people getting themselves into the wrong jobs have evolved.

There is perhaps no better example of someone being in the wrong job, getting there for all the wrong reasons and then doing all the wrong things, than that of our current Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

For all his ambition and inspiration, or rather his idolisation of Winston Churchill and how everything about Winston Churchill looked, Boris’ understanding of the man, his motives and his work are arguably only surface deep and no more than a perception at best.

Indeed, there is little question that Johnson and the whole political culture behind him is driven by the idea that being an MP and Prime Minister is merely based on the perception that it is all about being a public figure. That there are other people around who are always there to do the real work, and that all you need do is play the part and talk the talk.

The problem with having MPs that should not be MPs is that their lack of understanding of their own roles and responsibilities mean that they leverage the advice, guidance, understanding and s0-called expertise of other people who have also lost sight of why they are where they are and what their responsibilities mean.

This is how we came to find and experience so much of the Government’s Lockdown Policies being led by Health Professionals. Public servants who may know a lot about health, but have zero understanding or perspective when it comes how anything else in the world works or how it should be.

We are now approaching a crossroads where we can no longer afford to listen to, trust or be led without question by roles and jobs with titles. Especially when it is clear that the people in them are not the people we think they really are or know they should be.

It is who these people are and who they prove themselves to be that is the beacon of respect that we should be following.

We can no longer afford to fall into the trap of believing that anyone can be relied on simply because of what they are.

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