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Trump & Farage: The heralds of change, a final warning or an opportunity to put things right?

December 18, 2016 Leave a comment

trump-may-farage

2016 will surely be remembered for the watershed electoral events which have taken place on both sides of the Atlantic. But can we really say for certain just how people will view the impact of these historical moments, perhaps in just a few years time?

Churchill once said that ‘History is written by the victors’. Many of us would agree that such sentiment is true. But a problem arises with our view of 2016 when we look upon the British European Referendum in June and the US General Election in November and try to identify who, or perhaps more accurately what it was that actually won.

Yes, it is easy to look back at recent weeks and conclude that Trump won in the States – even if there does remain a question mark over Clinton’s result in terms of the popular vote. But if we look closer to home and back to what has become known colloquially as ‘Brexit’, such definition is far from easy – if indeed possible at all.

The figurehead whom most would recognise as having been the defining leader or agent of change which led us to ‘Brexit’ is Nigel Farage. However, the reality that key individuals such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove played highly significant parts too, surely attests to the reality that this seminal moment was about far more than the impact of just one person or three, and was in fact about a significant and great many more.

It sounds simple. But people and even the politicians who apparently lead them have a habit of hanging results or actions around the necks of the one person they identify as being responsible for something, rather than recognising the many contributing events, factors and the influence of any number of different people which may have contributed.

Whether the circumstances be good or bad, there simply is no difference. Change must have a face, and therefore a name.

We cannot take away from him the impact that Farage has clearly had on the rise of whatever this evolving collective is that won the European Referendum. It is almost certainly fair to say that the Prime Minister may regret not ennobling him far sooner than she might comfortably think.

However, the face and focal point that Farage has provided this otherwise undecipherable ‘movement’ for change, is also one which has multiple personalities. And it is perhaps this imaginary friend in which a truly diverse, yet massively significant range of choices for both the public and those in power now really lies.

People have responded to Farage because he has spoken with a voice which has sounded different to the political establishment, using language which has made people feel it is ok to have the feelings about the world around them that they do. He has dared speak terms loudly which we have all quietly become afraid to use, and demonstrated that a choice to what a silent majority have been quietly coerced to accept, does in fact exist.

Indeed, Farage and a growing number of key influencers from across the political spectrum are now providing a voice which is in varying ways representative of the anger and frustration which so many people feel.

He has elucidated his message well. However, while they may be late to the game, Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn and many others in politics are regurgitating a range of these specific truths.

They are doing so simply because the frustration and anger we are now experiencing after years of willful indifference and political neglect are now touching the lives of everyone, whether they would ‘naturally’ vote Conservative, Green, Labour, Liberal Democrat or UKIP.

But there is a problem with this too. Placing our faith in people who may be seen to be the heralds of change when they do not represent real change itself is very dangerous indeed. Many of these same faces have not only been present, but have also provided a voice for the very establishment which created those difficulties for us in the first place.

It is surely the case that those who are responsible for leading the change that will make our lives better, should fully understand and appreciate the complexity, nature and impact of the problems that must as such be left behind. Otherwise, it might only been seen as natural for them to reject everything associated with the period before, whether good or bad, simply because it represents the time when they didn’t possess the level of power which they have now come to cherish and enjoy.

We only need look at the last Century to recognise the warnings from history of how dark our lives could quickly become under the leadership of people who say much, but are completely out of touch when it comes to the world outside of the bubble that surrounds them.

In the UK, the chances of Farage having his hands on the levers of government do as such seem as remote as the possibility that Theresa May will steer us through the entire Brexit process trouble-free. On the other side of the Atlantic however, Trump may already be placed perfectly well to assume powers which he sees as being perfectly justified to prevent a return to the bad days of old. He does after all have a mandate to do so, based upon all of the truths that have been told – doesn’t he?

Nonetheless, to award Trump and Farage the status of demagogues as some have already tried, would be insulting to the realities and hardships of people that have for too long been openly denied.

Rejection of the status quo is after all no less populist than the election wins that facilitated their legitimate arrival via the policies of governments that came before and led to it.

And so, it is arguably the case that Trump, Farage and May are all riding a wave that they simply do not understand. But it is the direction and the choices that they make next that will decide the fate of all us when this ‘new tide’ really begins to break upon the shore.

The evidence may not look too promising so far, but let us hope that any power or responsibility that these three or any like them who follow will have over us from now onwards, will be exercised with a level of care and consideration which is ultimately beneficial to us all. For it is here that the true opportunity to address the problems which society faces truly lies.

 

images thanks to http://www.businessinsider.com, http://www.independent.co.uk, http://www.thetimes.co.uk

 

Cameron names his nemesis populism, but the Westminster set still refuses to accept that it was a rejection of self interest which was the key to Brexit

December 13, 2016 1 comment

imagesAs I stepped into the polling booth at a local church hall on the evening of 23rd of June and looked at the voting slip in my hands, the feeling that crossed my mind couldn’t have been further from the thought of being part of something populist, even if I had been confident that my No vote would contribute to an unscripted win.

I know that I am not alone, and whilst the bizarre polarity which now exists between Remainers and Leavers has reached the level that you will find friendships broken and even online dating profiles telling would-be suitors not to waste their time if they voted the other way, it is certain that David Cameron continues to do a great disservice to all voters by now suggesting that such a momentous decision could be made under the influence of a populist cause.

It isn’t cool to be a Leaver for the same reasons that our former Prime Minister came to draw that very conclusion.

Labelling and the use of umbrella terms to cover a multitude of different interpretations make life easy for politicians and the media alike. But they mean different things to different people. They provide an ill-considered opportunity to stereotype, and there is a very dangerous assumption that everyone who voted one way or the other did so purely on the basis that it was a populist choice and that we therefore think alike.

We don’t.

One of the most significant errors being made by politicians from across our range of political parties and even the USA beyond, is to believe that workable solutions to the root causes of the problems which have created these inappropriately labelled ‘populist’ votes can be narrowed down to focusing upon or addressing these tent-like terms such as ‘immigration’. Indeed, as we now progress forward from the Referendum they believe it sensible to use the newly coined ‘soft’ or ‘hard’ Brexit with the inherent suggestion that there is again some kind of black and white choice which still provides an ‘in/out choice’.

It doesn’t.

Not only are these terms misrepresentative and wholly misleading about the life-experiences which people are having across the Country, they are exacerbating the level of confusion that the mishmash of issues surrounding our relationship with Europe actually presents. And that’s the end of the story only if you are prepared to accept that the Referendum result was itself only ever about Europe.

People are neither one thing nor the other as leave or remain has been darkly painted suggest. The majority of people are in the most part probably sat somewhere in between.

But even ‘somewhere in between’  would be far too specific a way to try and position the basis of a debate or the questions which support it, when the European question relates so differently to so many people, depending upon just how the plethora of issues involved may have impacted upon their own lives on perhaps a very meaningful basis.

The European Referendum arrived at the front of what we will perhaps look back upon as the beginning of a perfect storm. One which has been created in no small part by many years of neoliberalism in its ascendancy, and the evolution of a political and governmental culture of self-interest. A self-contained entity which has seen decisions and policy making made within bubbles of understanding about the life experience of others and a narrative of the world outside which in relative terms operates no differently to the insular online realities that so many disenfranchised people feel falsely empowered by, and as such enjoy.

Many voters do not themselves understand the true complexity of the issues at hand, such as the role of Globalisation in freedom of movement, nor the impact that new and improving technology is having on the decimation of well-paid jobs which are disappearing rather than being awarded to some foreigner who is always guaranteed to do the job for less. They certainly do not consider the unrecognisable role of the taxpayer in subsidising low paid jobs through the benefits systems for the corporate businesses that could afford to pay more along with the impact on small ones whose owners would genuinely like to do so.

It is correct that we should all be able to expect those who have been elected to represent us would properly do so. Not only should they understand fully the issues before them, we also have the right to expect that they would legislate with balance, fairness and the full reach of consequence in mind.

Regrettably there is scant evidence that they do, and with the secret now open that political parties work only towards the delivery of a beneficial result in the next election, Westminster should be in no way surprised by the fact that continuing to do things the same way that they always have, will continue to yield results which beat to a different drum.

No. Many people voted ‘No’ through the feelings of isolation which our political establishment has dealt us over many years and Governments, and it is the frustration building up inside which in one way or another to each of us said ‘No, I can no longer go with what I see as this hollow and populist status quo’.

Referendum on Europe: France says you cannot switch to rugby when you are already on the pitch playing football. Do the Europhiles not realise that we only ever signed up to buy each other a drink rather than take to the pitch and play a game with rules that were never of our own choosing?

There can be little question that David Cameron is going all out to steal the initiative on Europe whilst all the other Political Parties are preoccupied with their leadership issues.

We would however be foolish not to take note of the responses coming from European speakers, whether positive sounding like Angela Merkel’s latest comments, or more contemptuous in nature as those from the French Minister Laurant Fabius who tells us that Britain joined a football club and now wants to play rugby.

Much will be made of the German Chancellor’s intervention which sounds far more favourable and positively aligned with the PM’s rhetorical stance on renegotiation of the UK’s relationship with our European Partners.

But behind the scenes, should we perhaps be just a little more eager to question whether this represents the early stages of yet another gleaming political fudge of the kind that we have sadly become all too used to, in a world where politicians are hardly rated for their qualities of trust?

Europe has arguably been the most divisive power in British politics for a generation or more, for reasons that we should perhaps not feel convinced that even the PM actually understands.

The centralisation of power, taking it further away from the people and placing it in the hands of the unelected, does after all rather fly in the face of the whole concept and convenient truth of the increasingly political union which was mythically presupposed to prevent another autocrat accumulating power over Europe, following the devastation that Hitler’s dark chapter wrought for millions across the Continent.

However, if this very aim was indeed the ‘football game’ that the French Minister has suggested, he, like many others should perhaps reflect on the fact that in terms of our only referendum on the European project to date in 1975, which pretty much did nothing more than authorise politicians to make a commitment to a free trading agreement, the British people have in fact comparatively done no more than agree with the European states to buy each other a drink in the bar, whilst participating within some unfavourably biased political ‘game’ on a bent playing field was never actually on the agenda.

Regrettably, many of our political leaders since then, have presided over the steady drip, drip, drip of power to the European Parliament through the devil-ridden-detail of documents such as the Maastricht and Lisbon Treaties, with the situation only being made that much worse by our perhaps overzealous cultural penchant for doing everything by the book and accepting changes to laws that affect almost every part of our lives like they really mean something, seemingly all without question, but actually with a rather large dollop of misplaced trust.

Shame then that successive British Governments haven’t taken the same approach with the power entrusted to them by us. Deliberately or not, they have acquiesced in allowing the European elite to expect little more than complete subjugation from the British People when our elected representatives have never had any democratic mandate to do so.

The principle of free trade with Europe is a good one, and nobody should be under any illusion about the 2-way dynamic of this relationship which serves European commercial interests as lucratively – if not more so, than our own.

But that is as far as it should have gone for us, and the fact that our political classes have allowed a situation to exist where a majority decision of foreign nations can prevent us upholding rights that are actually ours, and simply dismiss that notion as an attempt to change the rules of their ‘game’ is ridiculous.

Worse however, is the standing commitment of a British Prime Minister to support and uphold a ‘Yes’ vote in a referendum, which however it is worded, will surely result in a commitment and increasing material and political deference to foreign powers on the part of the people of this Country which voters have never knowingly signed up to.

The most concerning factor in all this, is not that we already have David Cameron shaping up his own Yes campaign whilst Nigel Farage almost certainly hopes that he will be the face of the No.

It is the simple non-existance of any political force which is even attempting to elucidate the real meaning and feeling of how the silent majority of people feel about the laws which are used to govern us, and how we all want to feel the return of a touch of reality in government, which doesn’t burn appropriate bridges with the Nations that abut our shores, but doesn’t also surrender the historic freedoms of this nation that quite frankly, nobody from outside is culturally equipped to fully understand.

Picture thanks to http://www.telegraph.co.uk

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