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80 Days until Brexit: 80 random things we know that many of our MPs clearly don’t

January 8, 2019 Leave a comment

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As we hear the rumblings of yet another one of Theresa May’s Brexit Backslides coming to us in the form of a threat to delay the implementation of Article 50, it is perhaps time to reflect on some of the things us Voters should be able to reasonably expect to exist within the field of our MP’s understanding.

With 80 Days until when Brexit is supposed to be, here are 80 random things to help you focus on what is, what has been and yes, what could be!

  1. Brexit was never supposed to happen (in so far as the Establishment is concerned)
  2. The EU doesn’t negotiate
  3. MPs do not know why we Voted for Brexit
  4. There are no big beasts in Parliament
  5. The Conservative Party has two parts
  6. MPs do not understand why we Voted for Brexit
  7. Theresa May is no leader
  8. MPs do not value the opinion of the People who appointed them
  9. Self interest is the underlying basis of any argument for Remain
  10. The underlying malaise in British Politics was uncovered by Brexit
  11. The Conservative Cabinet all put their own ambition before doing what is right
  12. Fear is the preferred method of manipulation from an Establishment that has lost control
  13. The Labour Party prize power over responsibility
  14. MPs don’t know the history of the EU
  15. Theresa May would be happy to commit us to a permanent and inescapable ‘relationship’ with the EU
  16. By leaving the EU, we will not be at risk of having to adopt the Euro
  17. As a non Member, the UK will not be tied to the EU’s Human Rights Regulation
  18. MP’s do not understand that change is inevitable
  19. By discontinuing our Membership of the EU, we will not be required to commit to the EU’s Military Programme
  20. As a stand alone Country we will be able to manage and protect our Fish stocks
  21. MP’s do not have confidence in the Country they were Elected to Represent
  22. Brexit is about the return of balance, fairness and community
  23. Remain obsessed MP’s project their own behaviour on to those they disagree with
  24. MP’s do not agree with the principle of democracy
  25. Away from the bureaucracy of the EU, we will be free to reduce or remove the red tape that means only large abattoirs are viable
  26. After a full and proper Brexit, we will not be subject to the jurisdiction of the EU Courts
  27. MPs see the Referendum Result as being open to interpretation
  28. After Brexit Day, the UK can have its own rules which serve our own marketplace best
  29. MPs are obsessed with the idea that you have to have a plan for everything
  30. After we depart, our Fishermen will not be restricted by quotas whilst watching other EU Fishermen fishing off our Shores
  31. MPs are out of touch with their constituents
  32. The SNP’s idea of Independence from the UK would be to then surrender and become absorbed within a the Foreign Power which is the EU
  33. Nobody actually thinks a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic is necessary
  34. Theresa May has and always will be a Remainer
  35. Jeremy Corbyn is no leader
  36. MPs and the Media give disproportionate value to noise
  37. The Brexit process was flawed from the beginning as it was launched from the position of being a member, rather than standing alone
  38. Back to being an independent Country in its own right, we can have our own Passports once we have left the EU
  39. We have a severe lack of morality and ethics in Parliament
  40. MPs covet the job but not the responsibility
  41. Government begins fighting the next election campaign the day after the last one was held
  42. You cant make plans for the unplannable
  43. MPs focus on addressing the effects of problems and not the cause
  44. The City & Financial Sector will have greater opportunities away from EU Control, once we are no longer obligated to follow their rules
  45. MPs don’t understand the history of the EU
  46. Theresa May values the opinion of Foreign Leaders more than she does her own Cabinet
  47. The EU needs a relationship with the UK, more than the UK needs a relationship with the EU
  48. MPs believe they can win any argument by asking the same question again and again until the get the answer that they want
  49. The Establishment holds the Electorate in contempt
  50. MPs do not communicate with constituents without a reason to do so
  51. The EU is committed to further integration and ultimately a United States of Europe
  52. The EU is a bureaucracy
  53. There is nothing democratic about the EU
  54. MEPs have no power within the EU
  55. We have adopted the Rules of a Foreign Power within just about every part of British Life without the Public being genuinely aware of what our Politicians had signed us up to
  56. The World outside the EU is much bigger and functions much better
  57. The Politicians of the day sold out our natural allies as the price of joining the Common Market – the forerunner of the EU
  58. The Conservative Party exists within a shrinking bubble
  59. Membership organisations like the CBI have their own agendas which are self interest wrapped up in another form
  60. Most British People are proud of who they are and the Country that they come from and want the noisy minority to stop aggressively victimising them for doing so.
  61. MPs no longer understand the meaning of loyalty
  62. Once we leave the EU, Freedom of Movement will no longer exist
  63. UK Taxpayers will no longer have to subsidise low-paid EU Nationals once we have left
  64. Once we have left the EU UK will have full control over ALL legislation
  65. Once we leave the EU, we will have control over our Fishing Rights
  66. Outside of the EU, our Farmers will no longer be disadvantaged by CAP
  67. As a non EU member, our Farmers will be unrestricted
  68. Once we have left the EU and the Common Agricultural Policy Farmers will not be dependent on Subsidies
  69. We can stop live animal exports once we have left the EU
  70. Ouside of EU derived legislation, our businesses no longer need to be tied to the EU’s working time directive
  71. MP’s find it easier to call people names or disqualify them in some way than countering legitimate arguments
  72. After Brexit, we can set out own Pollution Standards
  73. Following Brexit, the UK will have its own Borders again
  74. After 29th March 2019, the UK will be able to negotiate our own International Trade Deals
  75. After Brexit, we will be able to change and adopt our own Taxation systems
  76. Outside the scope of the EU, we will be able to prioritise British Companies and Production
  77. Outside of the reach of the EU’s bureaucratic machine, we can evolve Driving Standards & License Requirements to meet the needs of the UK Supply Chain
  78. After a real Brexit, we will not be paying money into the EU
  79. MPs are generally scared of the EU
  80. Once we have left the EU all decisions can be made democratically

And there’s certainly a whole lot more…

 

MPs who cannot respect the Will of the People should step aside and make way for genuine representatives who will

January 7, 2019 Leave a comment

You’ve probably heard the saying that absolute power corrupts absolutely, and so with it the suggestion that as the power of an individual increases, their morality and therefore ethics diminish in a like amount.

We should all be grateful that this is not generally an absolute rule. But in terms of today’s Parliament and the majority of the Members within it, I regrettably find myself being far from sure anymore.

Like many others, I have tapped away at my keyboard over recent weeks and months, at best bemused and at worst very sad at the state of British Politics and in particular what the activities and motivations of most of our MP’s has actually become.

That Brexit is the event that should never have happened in the minds of those who were Elected to serve us is already a given. That they are so hell-bent on overturning the democratic will of the people – even if it boils down to acts which are designed to deceive us all, gives a very telling insight of how dangerous to our democracy, the behaviour, self interest and lack of ethics and morality on the part of our politicians has actually become.

Yet to take debate and argument to a level where action will be taken to actively prevent the Brexit that the People Voted for, way surpasses the political malaise that has been present for a long time before the Referendum Vote and tells us that very few of the politicians elected to represent us actually understand what representation means and what the Representation of the People Act was itself brought into being for.

Holding up government might well prove to be a brilliant idea if you are a US President who has no concept of the pain caused and genuine loss of such action to others. But it is not the action of any individual or group of MP’s who paint themselves as being servants of the people, as respecting democracy and having the best interests of their Country at the heart of what they do – if they actually mean it.

To even attempt to derail the delivery of a democratic mandate – not because their fears have in any way been proven, but because they are simply too gutless and irresponsible to put their own ideas and plans to one side – is a travesty of democracy and of justice. They are simply trying to enact a decision that was never theirs to decide.

MP’s en masse are now making their position very clear. A position that shows they are incapable of carrying out the responsibility that has been entrusted to them. They are failing all of us, our Country, our future and it’s time that all of those MP’s who cannot see the will of the British People for what it is, however unpalatable they might themselves find it, should resign AND step aside.

We do not need a Parliament constructed of little other than the self-serving.

The UK has far too many issues that need redeeming, a prosperous non-EU future to embrace and far too many opportunities for good to be identified and acted upon for all of this to be put at risk by the lack of vision, integrity and care for others that is the only direction that all of these self-representatives are inclined.

 

image thanks to uk.businessinsider.com

 

 

‘Out means out’ is the clear message that would give certainty to the Brexit Process

August 4, 2017 1 comment

Unspoken words illustrated by actions, almost always speak more loudly than the words which accompany them. The approach which has been taken by Theresa May’s Government towards Brexit is certainly no different.

Management of expectation should be fluent practice for the politicians who have reached the heights of having a seat at the top table in the land. So it would be reasonable to conclude that the jumping off point for the Brexit Negotiations provides us with an accurate picture of the priorities of the Government for delivering our exit process.

Begin-with-the-end-in-mind.

It is of no great surprise that many people are concerned, given that Brexit looks like an unholy mess. One which is playing into the hands of ardent Remainers such as Vince Cable, given that the whole approach to the process has been in many ways portrayed as being about doing the minimum necessary to qualify the UK as no longer being an EU Member.

The current approach could more accurately be framed as over-promising with the quiet or unintended expectation that they will ‘be given no choice’ but to under deliver. The alternative would be the more robust and arguably honest approach of being clear from the start with us all by stating that we are now going to be completely out of European Union Membership once the Article 50 Notice Period is complete, and that anything we gain in our interests thereafter will be a benefit.

What could then accurately be called an under-promise leading to what anyone who sees our true relationship with our European Partners will know will be a significant lessening of expectations in terms of what the Government will then assuredly over-deliver.

While more than a year may now have passed since the EU Referendum with Negotiations in Brussels now appearing to be underway, it is far from too late to adopt this approach.

Yes, giving this level of clarity to the overall message would draw criticism from Remainers who continue to be convinced that they can influence the Negotiation Process to a degree where Brexit would occur in name only. But it would also provide a distinct level of certainty within what for us all will remain a fluid situation for a long time to come, where stepping off now with the worst case scenario providing a basis for our negotiating position going forward being a far more productive place to begin.

To continue managing the public perception of the Brexit process in the way that it is, the Government appears to be either attempting to be all things to all people – which even when well intended is unlikely to work; or is playing the rather dangerous game of planning for the UK to remain technically tied to Membership of the European Union via a relationship which the majority of British people do not want.

Yes, there are very big interests with equally big voices making very loud predictions of doom and gloom, openly threatening to leave the UK if their needs aren’t prioritised.

A perfectly sensible question in response would be to ask them why they are here anyway if the European Market is that much more important than our own.

The reality however, is that these self-serving overtures are really nothing more than a plea to a political class to keep everything which works profitably for those interests basically the very same.

These businesses have had influence and power over Government for a very long time due to the role that money is seen to play in just about everything. Yet in terms of Brexit, Money has now come into direct conflict with democracy and the will of the People. Nobody should be in any doubt about the interests which will benefit most if the UK should in any way now Remain.

The message is clear. Things can never be the same as they were before 23rd June 2016. Obstructive as these other interests may be, they also deserve to receive a clear message from the Government about the direction of travel, so that they can work with their own worst case scenarios. Scenarios which you can be assured will prove to be a lot better when we have formally left the EU, than they would willingly have us all suppose now.

The damage being done daily with the current lacklustre approach in terms of the relationship between Westminster all British People – who have an evolving distrust of the establishment, has the potential to be far reaching, particularly if the Negotiation Process should ultimately result in an avoidable fudge.

Whilst no British voter has knowingly endorsed the process of ‘ever closer union’ which successive British Governments undertook to create an increasingly closer and subservient political union with the EU, it would be utterly foolish for political strategists to believe that they can somehow delay or prevent the distinct and clinical reversal of that unsanctioned action, when the democratic instruction given by the Referendum Vote was very clear.

Of course, any ardent Remainer reading these words can and will pick holes in an argument like this by using their own view of Brexit and the Referendum itself to justify alternative reasoning. Democracy does after all only work for some when they are getting the results that they themselves want.

As a supporter of leaving the European Union from a time long before it ever became politically fashionable to be so, I can nonetheless say that I did not feel comfortable with the polarity delivered by the Referendum Campaign. Yet it has become ridiculous that a follow-up debate about ‘what Brexit will look like’ should then have been allowed to develop by the establishment and then framed as an optional change which can come in a choice of shades, wrapped up as either a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit.

Accepting that we are leaving – as most Political Parties now at least indicate that they do, would sound much more sincere, convincing and less like they were paying mere lip service to this inevitable change if all were to adopt a more definite tone such as ‘out means out’, rather than ‘Brexit means Brexit’. One which not only makes clear but endorses the otherwise universally held understanding that you cannot remain attached and at the same time be genuinely separate or no longer a part of something – as the British Electorate have commanded that we must now be.

In my last blog, I discussed the reality and impact of ideas or ideologies in politics rather than management according to all the facts. Brexit has regrettably come to fall under the same umbrella of ideas. It should be clear that our perspective of the process and creation of policy right at this moment in time and how things will actually work when we arrive at March 2019 will not then be the same as now or at any point thereafter.

The only certainty is that we are leaving and that is why it would be far more productive to talk in terms of the relationship that the UK then aims to have with the EU as being an aspiration, instead of a fixed relationship that we the or they in some way have the power to guarantee.

Acceptance that all sides of UK Politics have something to bring to this debate is essential and must replace the virtue signalling and disingenuous assumption of moral authority adopted by some, who fail to understand the expectations of everyone with views and feelings from outside their own bubbles. Especially so, as they refuse to work with those who do or have an alternative view to their own.

Just as if we were destined to travel to the top of a hill, it would be generally accepted as inevitable that there would be a climb involved in getting there. There may of course be different routes, choices of gradients or even helicopter rides to assist us to ascend. But one way or the other, we know that we will have to have reached the top of the hill itself before we ourselves know and everyone else will fully accept that we have got there.

In terms of our exit from European Union, complete UK Sovereignty is the top of that hill.

Regaining the power for our Westminster Parliament to determine all rules, laws and the obligations under which we live and operate as a Nation must be the red line above which nothing is acceptable in terms of influence from any other European Nation, combination thereof or indeed any foreign power.

To allow this key component of honouring its obligation the British Electorate to appear in some way negotiable – depending upon whether we can secure ‘agreement’ over certain things such as access to the Free Market, the need for a ‘Customs Union’ or the method under which we ‘can’ allow people to move across our Borders – The Government has perhaps unwittingly embarked upon a game of high stakes chess with the sanctity of the democratic relationship between it and the People.

To the Government, to the Opposition and to the other Political Parties with seats in Westminster beyond, it is the agenda of the British people which must be prioritised, first and foremost before any of their own, or indeed the very specific and self-serving interests which all too often support and therefore have influence over them.

All the Government really needs to do is change, make clear and evangelise the core message to one which reflects ‘out means out’ and then the support and understanding of how we can all work with and benefit from Brexit will soon begin to appear.

Whilst the siren calls of public figures such as the Archbishop of Canterbury may suggest that the devil is in the detail, the real challenge for those across Government is to now genuinely commit to the journey. They will then find that the seemingly impossible level of technicalities to consider as part of the Brexit process will be much simpler to decide – even within the significant volumes that they will come.

‘Soft Brexit’ or ‘Hard Brexit’ are no more than a Yes/No choice to a question which no longer exists

December 20, 2016 1 comment

brexitIf you are driving a car and find yourself in the unfortunate position of knowing you are about to hit something, time and space might momentarily slow down as you brace for the inevitable impact, but you don’t get a choice over the damage it will cause and whether the impact will be soft or hard. You just deal with the consequences thereafter.

It’s an analogy which some will quickly dismiss in relation to Brexit, but the parallels are there for all to see. The distinct difference being that in relation to the European Referendum, the result – and therefore the destination to which we already know we must travel, is a genuine exit for Britain from the European Union.

Much is now being made of the difference between the two terms ‘soft Brexit’ and ‘hard Brexit’, yet they are discussed in a way which suggests a choice about leaving the EU continues to exist.

If we respect the will of the majority of the British people, we will also accept that it does not.

What will be discussed when Article 50 has been triggered, both with the remaining Member Countries of the European Union and also the many Countries beyond will be the relationship and the way that it will work between all of us thereafter.

On the part of some, it is intentionally misleading. With others it is the the effect of a process of engagement being conducted by politicians who simply do not understand the impact on the general public from what they are doing. But either way, talk about dictating the terms under which the Government will negotiate Brexit do little more than indicate that the ‘remain lobby’ intend to halt Brexit in all but name, simply by insisting that the key qualifications and requirements of membership will ultimately be retained.

For them to succeed would be a political fudge of momentous proportions, not least of all because it will be representative of the same manipulation and game playing, focused on self-interest and political expediency by those in power, which inadvertently created the disillusionment and disenfranchisement which led to the choice for Brexit in June.

The choice was not simply about Europe, even if the question was framed that way. Outspoken Europhiles as well as those masquerading as born-again leavers within the political bubble would do well to remember this. People know their minds and they are not going to accept a giant backslide of the kind being advocated under the auspices of the disingenuous suggestion that anyone sensible or without prejudice who voted for Brexit didn’t have a clue what they were doing.

Talking up technical truths may well have been a big part of what the success of the Leave Campaign message was about. But these messages resonated so well with people because as any good marketing man knows, the adverts that really sell are always the ones which play on an element of a story which is inherently true.

Remain failed to connect with a working majority not only because they relied upon events that had no guarantee of ever happening – no matter how scary they might have been presented to seem, but because they were not able to sell or even speak of benefits to the lives of everyone in this Country which as a majority we could either see or believe.

It is a mistake to believe that a different campaign on EU membership dressed as ‘soft’ or ‘hard’ Brexit will now yield a different result, just as it is foolish to imagine that the European political terrain of before the 23rd of June 2016 still exists.

brexit-2

Our focus should now be well and truly upon developing the best post-Brexit relationships that we possibly can, whilst recognising that the remaining Members of the EU have as much to lose from a bad deal with the UK, if not arguably more so than we ever could, given the position as a self-governing, unrestricted and fully-open-for-business entity that this Country will then actually be.

images thanks to http://www.inthenews.co.uk, http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Brexit and the Supreme Court: What will be the price of ‘objective’ judgement if no new precedents are set?

December 13, 2016 1 comment

technical-truths

Dipping into the proceedings of the Supreme Court last week was hardly the emotionally charged experience that Leavers and Remainers had been conditioned by the media to expect. But should we really be surprised when case law is being used to define arguments that have never previously been made and do in fact need our Judges to make a judgement in the purest sense?

As with all too many arguments in the political sphere these days, there is no small amount of semantics in play. Labelling of one kind or another has progressed to a level where the very act of simplifying language has progressed beyond the point of being intelligent and really given the lie to the idea that one word really can and does mean the same thing to all people.

Never mind ‘hard Brexit’ this or ‘soft Brexit’ that. Judicial process is itself hiding the truth that case law did at one point or another have itself to be created. It was at these very moments that it was the objectivity of the Judiciary or other high-level-offices of responsibility upon which we have relied and trusted to make the decisions which would today become the precedents that the debate over parliamentary interest in the triggering of Article 50 has rested.

At a time when the level of public confidence in politicians can be generalised as being the core issue that brought Brexit about, we all need to see leadership within the system of law which reaches beyond the scope of sticking to what is considered safe, or fundamentally right, simply because it’s the way that it is expected to be done.

So when we look to the Judiciary for the impartial type of leadership which is sadly lacking from government, why have the Courts not focused on the chronology of events, and above all what cannot reasonably be disputed as the democratic will of the people?

The easy response would be to suggest that the Judges concerned are expressing views which have been informed by bias. Indeed many of our media outlets have gone to great lengths to explore the backgrounds and links of the Judges who sat on the case previously, as well as the 11 who have sat in the past week at the Supreme Court.

The upshot of this approach which is inherently linked to the Brexit camp, being the inference that a decision which goes against the perogative of the Prime Minister to trigger Article 50 directly and without further reference to Parliament is pro-Remain.

Be it right or wrong in terms of principle, the hardest pill to swallow for anyone looking in from the outside who supports Brexit is that the Judges have not done anything wrong by ruling the way that they already have. Nor will those sitting in the Supreme Court do so if they then uphold the previous ruling.

Yes, the Judiciary may well be hiding behind process and this could indeed give legitimised cover to the less objective members of a bench who might put personal or subjective views before what Brexiteers would see post 23rd June as being clearly right. But that is their gift and we are unlikely to ever know the truth to this question and the fact is that the system does – as its stands – both allow and facilitate an intelligent form of responsibility-ducking which sadly permeates all forms of government today.

Technical truths are the harsh and uncompromising reality of a protectionist and self-serving age where taking responsibility is considered dangerous and actions are legitimately excused by reference to the precedents set by others rather than what experience tells us exists in front of our own eyes.

The objective view would recognise the democratic decision and therefore the mandate of the people above all else. Equally it would reference the fact that Parliament has already had its say when it passed the legislation for the Referendum in the first place and then made that choice directly subject to the will of the people. Ironically, it would also reproach the significant transfer of legislative power which has been undemocratically transferred to the EU beyond the previous mandate given by the British people for a common trading relationship, respectful of national sovereignty, which people on all sides of the argument still actually want.

It is possible that the Supreme Court will support the Government view and allow the triggering of Article 50 without any further debate. But it is unlikely.

Like it or not, we simply do not exist within a time of true leadership. If we had, we would not be anywhere near the constant two and fro of discussions surrounding our exit from Europe and the rise of a new American President whose arrival together in 2016 are being heralded as the turn of a populist tide.

We certainly wouldn’t find ourselves questioning what constitutes good judgement.

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