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Posts Tagged ‘Law’

Levelling Level | The Reform of Policing

Good Policing exists when you are surprised to see a Police Officer, or you don’t have reason to regularly have them in your day-to-day thoughts.

Clearly, I am not talking about what we see or hear on our news streams every day or each night. But the reality is that we have lost confidence in the police, and like the courts and legal profession we have already discussed, we now have good reason to doubt the impartiality and motivation of the decisions that police officers make.

The responsibility is not one that falls on the shoulders of police officers themselves.

The Police are only carrying out and following the instructions that they have been given by our broken political leadership after all.

The responsibility for the problem lies squarely at the feet of politicians, who have instigated and forced targets on a public service to measure the success of the Police, when that success should be defined only when there is nothing to measure at all.

A Police Officer or Police Constable should have the ability, responsibility and power to act using their common sense with the law itself offering the only framework that they use as a management tool.

The processes that have been added to uphold the rights of people who have at the very least temporarily surrendered their right to enjoy the full rights to which any member of society who doesn’t infringe the rights of others should enjoy, have made the laws which govern our response to and the punishment of criminal behavior nothing more than a joke for real criminals. Meanwhile they have cast a very dark shadow for those who have been caught up in very little and instead of losing massively, should have just been told off and then sent home.

Like the many who are practical in their awareness of life and their approach, good Police officers do not need degrees to understand and enforce the law efficiently and very well. They just need a lot of common sense and the moral grounding in any situation to discern what’s wrong or right.

The fear of the controlling few that others cannot be trusted to do such a responsible job without rules that account for every thought and for every action, is reflective of how sclerotic and neurotic our whole society has become.

The Police need the freedom to do their jobs. So that people respect the law again and then fear the sight of a Police Officer, as it was before all the political correctness began.

Levelling Level | Common Sense and the lightest touch of Law and Regulation

Whilst I have made a big thing of the need to both regulate and monitor the ethical conduct of any industry or service that provides any goods, services or has an influence on the factors which are essential to a Basic Living Standard, we must in general terms step back from the culture of having laws for laws sake.

A basic framework for everyone’s conduct is of course essential. But the laws and regulations that do exist must only be there because they are essential for good order and good conduct to exist. Not because weak minded leaders are attempting to control.

People must be treated as the adults that they actually are. People must be allowed to live freely and able to exercise common sense in as many areas of their lives as possible.

The principle that we should all be guided by is that:

We should always be free to exist, to do, be and think as we may want, provided that our actions and influence to not impinge the right of any other person to be exactly the same.

Keir Starmer will not be the man for all seasons that we now so desperately need.

May 14, 2020 2 comments

When Jeremy Corbyn was Labour Leader, Boris looked World class.

That, for Boris, is the only relevant comparison that we have, becuase he and Keir Starmer are two different sides of the same damaged political coin.

With Boris star waning quickly indeed, a new Labour Leader who looks prepared, clinical and unlikely to lose his calm whilst jousting with the Prime Minister at the Despatch Box seems a reassuring sight indeed.

But it isn’t the case.

Sadly we have become used to judging politicians by differences between them that are surface deep. We are not used to looking further at what they represent and what difference they would really make in power.

At a time of National Crisis, set to go from bad to exponentially worse, we really should be clear how different the political leadership of the UK needs to be.

Boris’ moment was Brexit. He did good job of appearing to save something the Establishment had concluded we had already lost.

That Boris found himself Prime Minister owes more to the absence of anyone remotely Churchillian in stature in Parliament, than it does to the effervescent Clown show that was funny at a time when we had to accept there was no choice due to the way our political system is sewn up. Put bluntly, Boris was the best of a very bad choice.

Starmer appears a different beast for sure. He has the mind and experience of a Barrister and the track record of a high flyer from being outside of the Westminster too. His early performances at PMQ’s give the impression that lined up against the UK’s No1 Baffoon, this is a man on a mission who will get things done.

Sounds great. But that’s where the differences stop.

As far as the Establishment and the broken political system that propelled both Boris and the Leader of the Opposition into their roles goes, both are there to pursue their own ends and ideologies.

So as far as the impact of the changes they have the capability to make on our behalf, they are very much cut from the very same perpetually disappointing cloth.

A background in Law running part of the Establishment itself is no qualification for the good statesmanship that we need in a PM right now.

Like everything else, Law has become all about the money, the contacts, gongs and personal gain, rather public service and the assurance of a morally correct framework in criminal and civil law for this Country – as it should be.

Starmers qualification and experience offers hollow promise. The background he has, as all barristers and solicitors who have been elevated to parliament on the suggestion they make good MPs is fundamentally flawed.

They are adept at using the Law and policy to achieve their political aims. But they are not equipped nor have the understanding to ensure that the rules and framework they are using to govern is either morally or ethically right or fit for purpose is any way.

As the UK descends into chaos best visualised by what it would have looked like if the crew and passengers had clapped as the Titanic went down, we don’t have the time or lives to waste on going around the same old political leadership merry-go-round as we have done before.

Keir Starmer is not the man for all seasons that we need as PM.

It’s time to look beyond the usual suspects for the political change that will be required long before 2024 when the people realise that the time is now. 

 

The sharp fall in number of young Police Officers: When Criminal Law once again begins to mean something through the interpretation of its results, then so will having a career in its enforcement

January 13, 2013 Leave a comment

As the son of a former Policeman who walked the beat on the streets of Gloucestershire in the 60’s and early 70’s, I count myself very fortunate to have heard those first hand stories of a time when the application of Law in the first hand had a profoundly different and positive impact within our Communities.

Whether you were an innocent member of the public, a testosterone and cheek-filled proponent of the misdemeanour, or a fully fledged member of a criminal fraternity, you would never have dared imagine how things would change within just 50 years and how little the Police and the careers behind it are respected as they once were. It is therefore hardly surprising that the number of frontline Officers under the age of 26 has dropped by 50% in the past two years.

But are budget cuts and a lack of diversity the real causes of this difference in public perception, or is there something far deeper and fundamental behind this change of understanding which leaves many wondering if the Police really want to do much more than target the law-abiding of middle England for trivial offences which often generate fines and leave the Nations bill-payers paying even more?

In a time when Police Officers were respected, the slightest fear or embarrassment generated by being stopped by a Constable would be enough to teach far-reaching lessons and probably halt the fall of many a young person, without any need of further recourse or entry to a Court system which at that time was frighteningly efficient in comparison to today.

Those who saw their role as a Police Officer as being a vocation were supported in their work by a system which worked on the basic practicalities that fear of an effective system of law create. They were confident in their actions, well knowing that when cases were taken before even a Magistrate, that very same system of Law would recognise that they had not taken up the time of the Bench or Judiciary without good reason.

But things have changed, and the actions of a few who abused that system, ultimately have made it impossible for the many who follow behind them today.

An obsessive drive by idealist reformers to eliminate even the slightest chance of conviction for anything less than 100% surety of guilt, followed swiftly by the heralding of the human rights of criminals who surrendered those very rights through their actions, have rendered the system sterile from one end to the other.

It is therefore little wonder that young people have as much interest in enforcing the Law as the rest of the Nation has in their contempt for it.

It doesn’t matter if a policeman is young, old; black, white; male, female: tall, short; fat or thin if the Law is feared which sits behind them.

It’s time that Politicians accepted that idealism in Law and Order simply doesn’t work when applied in practical form. When Criminal Law once again begins to mean something through the interpretation of its results, then so will having a career in its enforcement.

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