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Keir Starmer: Another Gutless Shitwizard who believes Opposition is just a waiting room for power

Right now, I, like many others, would love for there to be a fully functioning Opposition to this Government. A spectre haunting every movement they make and taking apart everything the Johnson Government has done.

It wouldn’t matter what the Opposition politics or background were. Just to have someone, some people, some politicians who are in precisely the right place, at the right time to ask the right questions and hinder the Government over everything that they have done. It would mean that we had an Opposition that were being everything that the British People need Her Majesties Opposition – and specifically, their Leader to be.

But there is no opposition. It simply isn’t there. The Official Leader of the Opposition is little more than an empty chair.

At the time when someone with a legal mind and professional background as a barrister should be using the very specific set of career skills and the experience that we do know Keir Starmer has, he should be eviscerating each and every one of the Government’s Covid Policies. Yet instead of a voice of reason and an inspirational passion for all of the people that we are repeatedly told the Labour Party stand for, a meaningful form of Opposition leadership is simply nowhere to be seen.

What we have instead is an Opposition that is making up the numbers. Under Starmer, Labour is providing an insurance plan that underwrites the Johnson Government’s wayward Covid Policies – all of them being whimsically led by what will surely prove to be one of the most defective Prime Ministerial terms the UK has ever had.

After the chaos and quantum leap backwards, engineered by Jeremy Corbyn’s tenure, it has been easy for commentators to suggest that Labour is in the middle of an existential crisis.

There was a belief that Keir Starmer was the safest pair of hands that the Party had. But that doesn’t account for the disturbing reality that the whole of the British Political System is itself going through an existential Crisis. One so bad that it should not be difficult for any political leader who can connect with people and understand them to pull their own Party – and potentially the whole British Political System through to daylight the other side.

Keir Starmer’s trademark policy has instead to prop up a dangerous buffoon. And as I anticipated in the blog I published in May 2020 Keir Starmer has proven not to be the man for all seasons that we now so desperately need.

In fact, his tenure is far worse than I could have imagined 14 months ago. Starmer has instead driven Boris to do his absolute worst with Covid Policies that our Parliament and all the 650 MPs within it should never ever have approved.

The latest let down in Starmers idea of public representation is Starmers open support for Vaccine Passports; a form of divisive draconian social policing that there is simply no logic or legitimacy to any argument of support.

In terms of the so-called ‘progressive’ causes that the Labour left have championed for so long, this move to support a Policy that is set to legitimise prejudice and division between people who once relied on for help, tells us that what is left of the Labour Party is now playing a very different kind of tune.

It is a long time since anyone at the top level of British Politics was there for anyone or anything other than their own self-interested cause. Sadly, we all have a habit of looking upon those who seek election to the office of MP and unwittingly buy into the conditioned lie that all MPs are super human, super gifted and super ethical – as they would all like us to believe them to be.

We have now had a series of Governments, with different Political Parties governing and with different Leaders leading us as our PM, who have basically bluffed their way along, doing very little of value to us in terms of making life better for any of us in the ways that they should be committed to doing for everyone. The vacuous, empty-vessel nature of all their leaders had only failed to be found out because there have been no national or world events that required any of them – until Brexit – and then Covid – to bring demonstrable leadership skills to the fore.

Theresa May, and then Boris Johnson both failed the tests of leadership that fate has thrown at them.

May was removed by an act of Tory Regicide, with only the framework of her Brexit Withdrawal Agreement handed on in the form of a minefield as her legacy to Boris. Boris then treated the entente cordiale with the EU as something to be unsparingly driven over with a reinforced challenger tank, doing infinitely more damage than real leadership would.

Boris’ real legacy and the damage it is still doing to our Country and to us all is something that can and will only be reconciled once every event linked to his and his Government’s decisions have taken place, and we have all had the benefit of time to look back.

The decades old assumption that political power keeps going around in circles, being passed between the two main parties over periods of time did of course lead ambitious MPs like Keir Starmer and Ed Miliband before him to believe that all they needed to really do as leader of the Opposition, was play the game. Their opportunity to be called to Buckingham Palace would simply then arrive in good time.

All the leaders and would be leaders and the great many unhealthily ambitious MPs who believe that the role of PM will just find its way to them if they work slavishly and unquestionably for their party machines, really do believe that being a backbench MP, junior minister, shadow minister or Leader of the Opposition is just some kind of elementary waiting room. A place where they just sit quietly, say nothing that will hurt their progress and bide their time on the way to power. The problem then comes when they get the star role they coveted and are then required by unforeseen events to lead with responsibility for lives of millions of others that they did not.

It is simply ridiculous and disingenuous at best for any MP not to lead from the roles that they have got at a time when the whole Country has been put to a massively challenging test – caused more by the way that it has been handled, rather than the Covid Virus itself.

Keir Starmer not only could but should have been putting the minds of millions of people at rest by showing us that we could expect a very different type of leadership from a Labour-led Government, if and when the Johnson Government collapses, and that they are heirs apparent to step in and fill the void.

Instead, all that we have seen is given what might be a make-or-break opportunity for the whole Country, Starmer plans not only to do the same as Boris Johnson and the Conservatives have done before him; both he, the Labour Party and whoever falls in behind them to save their necks (again) will do exactly the same. But under his leadership, they will do it with aplomb.

Like all the other MPs who are sitting and have missed every opportunity to face danger or any threat to their seats or positions since the Covid Pandemic was born, Starmer is just another gutless shitwizard sitting tight in the waiting room, thinking he doesn’t need to do or say anything meaningful, until his time to be in power comes along.

Keir Starmer will not be the man for all seasons that we now so desperately need.

May 14, 2020 1 comment

When Jeremy Corbyn was Labour Leader, Boris looked World class.

That, for Boris, is the only relevant comparison that we have, becuase he and Keir Starmer are two different sides of the same damaged political coin.

With Boris star waning quickly indeed, a new Labour Leader who looks prepared, clinical and unlikely to lose his calm whilst jousting with the Prime Minister at the Despatch Box seems a reassuring sight indeed.

But it isn’t the case.

Sadly we have become used to judging politicians by differences between them that are surface deep. We are not used to looking further at what they represent and what difference they would really make in power.

At a time of National Crisis, set to go from bad to exponentially worse, we really should be clear how different the political leadership of the UK needs to be.

Boris’ moment was Brexit. He did good job of appearing to save something the Establishment had concluded we had already lost.

That Boris found himself Prime Minister owes more to the absence of anyone remotely Churchillian in stature in Parliament, than it does to the effervescent Clown show that was funny at a time when we had to accept there was no choice due to the way our political system is sewn up. Put bluntly, Boris was the best of a very bad choice.

Starmer appears a different beast for sure. He has the mind and experience of a Barrister and the track record of a high flyer from being outside of the Westminster too. His early performances at PMQ’s give the impression that lined up against the UK’s No1 Baffoon, this is a man on a mission who will get things done.

Sounds great. But that’s where the differences stop.

As far as the Establishment and the broken political system that propelled both Boris and the Leader of the Opposition into their roles goes, both are there to pursue their own ends and ideologies.

So as far as the impact of the changes they have the capability to make on our behalf, they are very much cut from the very same perpetually disappointing cloth.

A background in Law running part of the Establishment itself is no qualification for the good statesmanship that we need in a PM right now.

Like everything else, Law has become all about the money, the contacts, gongs and personal gain, rather public service and the assurance of a morally correct framework in criminal and civil law for this Country – as it should be.

Starmers qualification and experience offers hollow promise. The background he has, as all barristers and solicitors who have been elevated to parliament on the suggestion they make good MPs is fundamentally flawed.

They are adept at using the Law and policy to achieve their political aims. But they are not equipped nor have the understanding to ensure that the rules and framework they are using to govern is either morally or ethically right or fit for purpose is any way.

As the UK descends into chaos best visualised by what it would have looked like if the crew and passengers had clapped as the Titanic went down, we don’t have the time or lives to waste on going around the same old political leadership merry-go-round as we have done before.

Keir Starmer is not the man for all seasons that we need as PM.

It’s time to look beyond the usual suspects for the political change that will be required long before 2024 when the people realise that the time is now. 

 

The 2013 Budget has created more perspiration than aspiration for those who keep on paying the Nations bills. It’s about time the Coalition Government started growing balls on their own Bench, rather than gifting their Opposition the opportunity to do it for them

March 22, 2013 Leave a comment

This week’s Budget has been received differently by us all and in a manner which illustrates all too clearly how shallow Policy making has now become when imbalance and impact are considered.

Talk of support for working mothers with young families, tax free loans for first time home buyers and even a 1p drop in duty on a pint of beer have done little to disguise the fact that there are so-called  ‘winners’ and then real losers at every turn. The Chancellor has done little to give any credence to his ‘Budget for an aspiration Nation’, other than the complexity of the words he used to speak this statement.

As a culture which now thrives on the use of labels and stereotypes, we have happily painted ourselves into a set of social pigeon holes where many of us hide from the realities which we share with many others. Successive Governments have formed policies on this basis which has left very few of us with any immunity from the pros and cons of a Taxation and Benefits system where the only thing universal is its level of unfairness and the disparity that now fails us all through its application.

Getting to grips with economic problems which are continuing to grow at an alarming rate will not be achieved by tinkering around the edges. Nor will we as a Nation be insulated against the gathering storm of explosive financial issues within the European project, such as those in Cyprus, unless Government begins to consider all Policies in terms of how they will impact upon all others and not just in the isolationist manner that they have continued to do so up until now.

A truly balanced and fair approach to formulating Government Policy now seems to be the most alien of concepts to our Politicians, particularly when party politics has been the long accepted means by which to target benefits to those whom are considered to be your bread-and-butter support.

But until the time that Politicians accept the principle of fairness in a meaningful way as a guide to Policy making, and particularly where Taxation and Benefits are concerned, nothing for anyone else outside the Westminster Village is going to change.

Government will soon have no option but to use systems such as a Flat Tax and wholesale simplification of the Taxation System if they genuinely want to treat everyone fairly whilst encouraging growth, prosperity and ambition in a way which balances the books.

Benefits must be targeted and restricted for the use of those who genuinely need them using common sense as a guideline, rather than the culture of tick-boxes which allows so may to play the System within a politically correct and fearful age.

Above all, Politicians must now accept that Policies created on the basis of improving rights in the workplace have now gone so far beyond their point of good, that they have made some of the very jobs they were created to improve unaffordable to the employers who at one time provided them.

Whether Westminster likes this as a truth or not, each and every Government Policy in existence today interchanges with almost every other, through the impact it has upon the lives of us all. Policy implementation may have its benefits to some, but this has for far too long been at the unacceptable cost to the many. This has to change.

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