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Surviving The Great Reset | Survive & Thrive | Reuse, Recycle, Repair

Whilst I have already touched on the revival of Make do and Mend, it cannot be understated just how much we can all help ourselves as this period of crisis deepens, by stepping away from the reliance we have, that everything we need, will come to us ‘new’.

It won’t. Easy everything is at its end.

Yes, the supply of new goods will appear to continue for a time, with that supply coughing and spluttering in terms of those things that remain available. But many other items – particularly those which are items we want, rather than what we need, or that come to us from great distances across the world – will simply disappear from our lives for good.

One way or another – affecting those most who find affordability the main issue first, followed by all those who believe they have plenty of money now and find that it quickly becomes less and less until what they ‘have’ has no value at all – ‘new’ simply isn’t going to be the ‘go to’ option anymore.

It’s all going to be about what we can reuse, how we can reuse it. What we can repair and how we can repair it. What we can recycle and how we can reuse goods that cannot be used again for their original purpose, and then repurpose them in the best way possible – to benefit ourselves and to benefit us ALL.

Think smart. Think about the skills that you really have already or those that you could easily learn. Think about a very practical world where everything revolves around life, living and the community, where people and not money are the centre of everything, rather than what we only appear to have going on around us right now.

If you have an interest or talent in arts and crafts, or even feel quite proficient at DIY, the chances are that you can put that interest or ability to good work. First to help yourself, but also to help others around your neighbourhood and community too.

Recycle, Reuse, Repair

We only believe that we have to continually have new things all of the time, because it has been in the interests of somebody else to create and propagate the myth that this is so.

Products of all kinds that we use daily or very often could and should last much longer than they do. In fact, they could even be repaired or renewed, if the companies that produce them didn’t have regular repeat sales – and therefore profits always first in their minds.

The process behind this is called Planned Obsolescence.

Planned Obsolescence is one of the most cynical, exploitative and unnecessary processes that industry and big business has ever designed. All with making money in mind. It’s not green or in any way environmentally friendly, and the knock-on effects over decades have been massive amounts of production that we didn’t need, that we have had to pay for and that has used inestimable levels of resources around the world, for no genuine cause.

Clothing: What we need

The basic standard for personal clothing provision would be to be able to maintain 2/3 sets of clothing for general use. To have 1 set of all-weather clothing and to have 1 set of clothing for special events.

Beyond this, all communities should have their own lending library or service for clothes.

Levelling Level

The Tory Right named their latest response to it Levelling Up. For decades, Labour and the Left have responded to it with public policy that adds up to levelling down.

But what is ‘it’? Do our politicians actually know what ‘it’ is? What is ‘it’ they don’t understand?

Today, we find ourselves in the early stages of a cost-of-living crisis and a fall in living standards that is the worst since records began. But these are only some of the issues we now face.

Social mobility, debt, housing, energy, inflation or stagflation, healthcare, climate change, education, wealth inequality, fake news, crime, wokeism and many other problems join the list that’s fast growing into this out-of-control crisis that is touching everything we know, too.

Change is happening around us in ways that make very little sense. Yet the messages we hear in the media and from our politicians suggest that everything is as fine as it can be. It is leading many of us to assume that we are alone with our views and feelings; thinking that we must be going mad.

The UK is the person with major health problems. It’s in a beauty salon, where every wannabe politician must be seen as top dog by everyone. But this political class are just the Saturday morning trainees, only able to sweep up and comb hair*. They smile sweetly and tell the Country that having a great look is all it takes to fix the problems experienced by all. Meanwhile, what the UK really needs is every form of medical surgery known, with the mental health care and physical rehabilitation necessary to make every part of our system work together, returning the UK to full fitness and providing fair and balanced lives for everyone in the shortest time possible.

With an establishment obsessed with sound bites and messages, rather than public policy that has real depth, Adam Tugwell unpicks the realities of Levelling Up, levelling down and decades of mismanagement and self-interest from a political class that simply isn’t up to the job.

Adam demonstrates that the broken tools of a flawed political age will always leave someone, somewhere behind, and shows that our politicians are repeatedly failing to create the social backstop that the UK needs to stop anyone being avoidably disadvantaged.

Levelling Level focusses on the inevitable process of change affecting everything around us that underway today. It discusses how we can harness the experiences that will accompany the challenges that we face to make life better by establishing a Basic Living Standard for all.

Levelling Level proposes that it is not money and financial wealth, but people and the way that our society treats its poorest and most vulnerable that underscores our real value, success and health as communities and as a Nation.

Levelling Level is a solution to the UKs problems that works for all.

*The qualified hairdressers are the government officers and civil servants, or people who like to ‘nudge’

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