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The pressing need for Local Market Exchanges and Local Market Exchange Platforms

One of the reasons that we should all feel confident that we can survive and thrive through the coming years and months, and that we can all play an active and positive part in creating the new system that is balanced and fair for all, is because much of the creative and innovative thinking is already out there that will build every part of it.

It is just the question of what, why and who people will be doing these things for that has to be settled before work on our new world and The True Economy can begin.

When money doesn’t work for the majority of people, we will have reached a point where things could go a number of ways.

Please look kindly on anyone who loses their shit in these circumstances. Desperation doesn’t excuse poor behaviour of any kind. But it does provide good incentive to organise anything and everything that we have available to our community and the people within it, as quickly as we can.

The first step to maintaining order, is to pool everything that the community has available and to be fully transparent about what the community has, and how it can and will be shared.

If it comes down to a situation where people are going hungry, transactions cannot be based on exchange, and must be based on the simple act of sharing what we have and don’t need for our own immediate requirements, and not on what others can ‘afford’.

The next step is to create a system of fair exchange, that functions on what everyone can give, or what they can trade or barter.

The principle value of this exchange system, or Local Market Exchange, will be based on the time, skills, experience and basic labour that it took to provide whatever the essential foods, goods or services being exchanged might be, or what it would be when the complete process of putting that food, those goods or services would be, when considering the process from end-to-end.

The creation and development of the Local Market Exchange will take place in two primary stages:

  1. Bartering & Exchange of goods, supplies and services that the community already has available, or which it has the ability to grow, manufacture or provide, and
  2. The creation of a new localised currency linking, anchoring or pinning transactional value of foods, goods and services directly to the number of people and/or the contributions (input to the system) that they make.

Starting anew: The economic phoenix without any need for ashes being involved

So, lets imagine we have reached the point where the financial system as we know it has collapsed.

Money simply doesn’t work. What happens next?

Well, people need to eat. People need to be able to buy essential food. People then need to be able to secure the basic essentials that they need too.

With no money in circulation, or no money that has value in circulation, people will begin to exchange or swap what they have and have accepted they don’t need, or can do without, for the things that they do need and that they cannot do without.

No law, regulation or threat from any authority will stop this.

When people are going hungry or need to provide, they will do whatever they can to secure whatever it is they need, and swapping, exchanging or bartering is a lot more civilized than what will happen if theft or violence becomes the next step by default.

The good news for us all, is that whilst the system may have collapsed around us, the technology and infrastructure are unlikely to have disappeared. The issue we face is that the technology and infrastructure isn’t currently set up to work in a very localised or microeconomic way, when this is how we need technology, infrastructure and the governance that oversees it, to help all of us.

Levelling Level | Bartering, Exchange and using money in the right way

Money is a unit of exchange that doesn’t hold any value of its own.

However, we have been conditioned to think that it is the money itself and not the goods or services that we use money to exchange with that have no value until such time as they are bought or sold.

This way of thinking only serves the rich, powerful and governments that have an unhealthy desire for control.

In the period of change or transition – or the process of correction that lies ahead, the financial system and the way that money and our currencies are valued today will inevitably change.

The process of that change itself is likely to involve and be driven by inflation of a kind that will at least temporarily make money worthless in every practical sense.

It follows that during a period of turmoil such as the one that we face, the joined-up thinking and continuity of the way that money and finance works that we have been used to and taken for granted will break down.

Whilst a transition to a new financial system that works fairly and appropriately, and at the right way that it should for everyone, it must not become an aim that can be in any way compromised.

Like politics and the system of government structures around it, it is because of the role that money plays – as it will continue to do so, even in its correct form, it is absolutely necessary that the monetary system and the way that financial systems work are dictated and governed from the grassroots up.

To do otherwise, puts all of the power and utility that money and its use as a medium of exchange provides into a third parties hands.

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