Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Democracy’

The PM’s Tory Conference entrance was one giant tell and the air is thickening with the stench of a political fudge

October 9, 2018 Leave a comment

img_1536

Treating people like mushrooms; keeping them in the dark and feeding them on bullshit, is likely to be the greatest epithet of the EU.

Despite the result of the 2016 EU Referendum in the UK, the message that the general population has grown wise is still not getting through.

We now see the EU engaged in one of its classic bluff-based, interactive dances with one of its greatest disciples, Theresa May.

Last weeks entrance to the Conservative Party Conference should really be read for what it was. Not merely the pretence of  hamming it up to try and look cool for a tired and trivialised audience on the part of an incompetent Prime Minister. But the meaningful strut of a confident peacock certain that the audience is about to be taken in completely by a very colourful and expansive display.

As many will already know. The EU has well-documented form when it comes to creating the impression that things are going differently to how they would like them, and by double bluffing or even doubling-down when they sense they are at the point of a win.

Over recent days, we have not only witnessed the arrival of the great pretender in all her glory, but claim and then counter claim that a deal on Brexit is getting closer and closer. Then we are assured that the truth is not any such thing.

Meanwhile the obsessive talk of a second Referendum is becoming so frequent that its inevitability is being deliberately painted into our consciousness whilst we are being coerced into questioning the original first and legitimate democratic win.

Chequers was never based upon an honest principle of ‘Brexit means Brexit’. It was a calculated way to bluff up a storm at the end of which once unacceptable concessions would then be seen as being perfectly reasonable, keeping Brexit in name only as the only option saved from the bin.

Regrettably, politicians from all areas of the political spectrum and from both sides of the  EU Membership Debate seem to be buying into this either emotionally, or just logically to save theor own necks.

Many sense that the only way that Brexit can be delivered legitimately will be if there is another General Election – one which with Theresa May in No. 10, the Conservatives have little to guarantee them that they can win.

We cannot be sure what form it will take. But the devil will most certainly be in the detail of any agreement that May attempts  to persuade us that she has negotiated and achieved.

One of the greatest political fudges and injustices is now in the making. And its success was ushered in with a gawky, inelegant rendition of Abba’s Dancing Queen.

Followed to its ultimate conclusion, the only satisfactory outcome in the Under-representation in Democracy debate would be for everyone to become an MP

December 29, 2017 Leave a comment

download (12)Whilst ‘minority’ groups have increasingly found their long overdue voice and platform in recent times, we must be aware of the danger that seeking to control and impose a membership of the House of Commons which reflects all members of society and is distilled down into 650 Parliamentary Seats to do so, will neither reflect the true nature of our society at National level, nor give a truly reflective representation of the voters of each Constituency which elects each of those representatives or MP’s alone.

We feel let down. We feel misunderstood. We feel that our needs are not being fully considered. We feel that other people’s needs are being prioritised before our own. We do not feel that anyone without our experience of life could represent us as well as one of our own.

But this is not the experience, perception or outlook of just a member of a minority. It is an experience which is shared by and common to us all.

It doesn’t matter if we are English, Welsh, Irish, Scottish or from someplace else. Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu or Jew. Straight, Gay, LGBT. ‘Able bodied’, disabled or suffering from a condition or disease. Young, old. Married, single. Rich, poor, employed, unemployed and much, much more. We all feel the same about the way that Government and politics is failing us.

Yes, lack of effective representation is a real issue. There is a tangible disconnect between us as voters and the people who lead us. But that will not be fixed by positively discriminating to deliberately place individuals into positions of power who are qualified only by being labelled as different to the rest of us. After all, it is the very fact that politicians are already behaving and making decisions differently to what we already expect, which is causing the problem now. Why would we want to encourage this problem by promoting focused thinking even more?

All women shortlists have been in existence for the selection of parliamentary candidates for some time now, but even when we look at the issue of representation of women in parliament today, we are still embracing positive discrimination which whilst it looks good to some, will continue to be prejudicial – perhaps to us all – in some other way.

There is no question that the role of becoming a Parliamentarian should be open to anyone. But it is not gender, colour, race, sexual orientation, religion or any other ‘definable’ difference between us that qualifies any one of us to be better as a representative of all.

Seen or unseen, each and every one of us is in some way different. So the only way we could genuinely ensure that every viewpoint is accurately represented politically, would be for each and every one of us to be elected as an MP.

It is having the ability, ethics and motivation to provide a genuine voice for all which counts most in a democracy. But it is the state of politics which has created a lack of this and makes a lack of good representation for all a real problem.

 

image thanks to standard.co.uk

Using money to thwart democracy is dictatorship wearing different clothes

January 26, 2017 1 comment

gina-millerInequality is a current and far reaching issue in the UK today. The difference between rich and poor, the educated elite and those with ‘poor education’ or the 1% and the rest are topics which are never far from the news, even if they are presented in an indirect but nonetheless similar way.

Whilst it would now be easy to challenge any portrayal of imbalance within ‘normal’ life across in the media, the fact remains that wealth, education, housing, employment, healthcare and the opportunities to access just about every method of support which can make a difference to any one persons quality or experience of life is not available to each and every one of us in exactly the same way. The same opportunities are not given to everyone, and however unacceptable or unpalatable this may seem, it remains an almost universal fact.

The social disparity which people experience today is sadly just an evolution of a problem which has been consistent throughout history, albeit at varying levels and presented in terms which have been contemporary for the times.

Beyond birth and death, our shared reality offers no genuine equality between any two people.

Whilst the rights lobby and so-called ‘progressives’ are unlikely to agree, human experience and free will render the possibility of true equality obsolete.

Democracy and the process of giving everyone within a community the same choices – even within the framework of restrictions which is imposed, is likely to be one of the most equal of opportunities which are the same for everyone. Whatever somebody’s background, address, bank balance or work status, they equate to the very same thing when it comes to placing a voting slip in the ballot box. We are conditioned to expect the same of the Law in this Country too.

The relationship between democracy and Law is all too easily overlooked. This has been alarmingly well illustrated by the decision on triggering Article 50 by the Supreme Court.

In the UK today, democracy franchises the Law. Yet the Law has now inadvertently been used to franchise an alternative to democracy; one which is being facilitated by money, which has been supplied by just a few people who have the financial means to manipulate a process which places emphasis upon technical truths, in order to promote and deliver upon their own view.

Dress it up in whichever way you like, by challenging the instruction which the result of the European Referendum provided, those who funded the Court action against the Government have used independent means to frustrate democratic process. They have successfully played the process of Law against the very people it is there to consider, to support and intended to represent above any private interest.

In this light, we can clearly observe the relationship between wealth and influence. Money is power and the injustice that befalls far too many everyday people, simply because the views of the few who have sufficient wealth to facilitate a decision which frustrates the will of the many is very frightening indeed.

At best, it appears that money can now be openly used to manipulate the result of a democratic process which will effect the lives and future of everyone in the Country.

If such ignorance of the majority view were to be as blatantly replicated by a handful of politicians or the prime minister who leads our Government by misusing their power – no matter how valid they believe their own argument to be, we would be justified in using terms to describe such behaviour as being akin to dictatorship.

The question we should all perhaps now be asking is what is the difference here and perhaps where else is this approach being used?

image thanks to telegraph.co.uk

%d bloggers like this: